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Understanding and Managing Chronic Heart Failure

Lifestyle In addition to surgery, device implantation and medication, making positive lifestyle changes is often a part of the treatment of chronic heart failure. Making healthy changes to your diet and lifestyle can help improve the symptoms of chronic heart failure. Healthy Diet Taking control of your diet is a key part of managing chronic heart failure. Your doctor will work with you to help you understand what you need to do in order to eat healthier. The following tips are frequently prescribed: • Eat less sodium (salt). In your body, sodium retains water, which can How to Read a Food Label Nutrition Facts Serving Size 1 cup (240g) Servings Per Container 2 Amount Per Serving Calories 100 Calories from Fat 20 % Daily Value* Total Fat 2g 3% Saturated Fat 0g 0% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 70mg 3% Total Carbohydrate 17g 6% Dietary Fiber 3g 12% Sugars 5g Protein 4g Vitamin A 70% • Vitamin C 20% Calcium 15% • Iron 8% *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Understanding and Managing Chronic Heart Failure Serving size This tells you how much of the food makes up one serving. If you eat more than one serving, all the other values increase. Fat This is the total amount of fat in each serving. Limit saturated fats and avoid trans fats. Both are bad for your health. Cholesterol This tells you how much cholesterol is in a serving. It’s wise to limit your daily cholesterol intake. Sodium (salt) This is the total amount of sodium in each serving given in milligrams (mg). Try to eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Total carbohydrate (starches) This tells you how many grams of carbohydrate are in one serving. 1 © 2014 Mended Hearts and StayWell. All rights reserved. How to Read a Food Label Download/print this PDF cause your heart to work harder, while also contributing to edema and shortness of breath. Generally, no more than 2,000 mg per day is recommended, but some experts recommend limiting salt to less than 1,500 mg per day. Your doctor will probably recommend a maximum level of daily salt intake for your diet. Be particularly careful of “hidden” salt—many processed and prepared foods have added salt in them. Read the labels to be sure of how much salt you’re getting with each serving. Some restaurants now list the nutritional information of their dishes, as well. 15


Understanding and Managing Chronic Heart Failure
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